Single-page Platform

Economy and Public Finance

Resolution #1 - Public finances: An urgent recovery: Elements of political statements

Political statements of A CPQ government in terms of public finance and taxation respect the values of A CPQ government, the respect for freedom and individual rights, individual responsibility, a market economy, a state that’s sticking to the basics, a confidence for Quebecers and a place for Québec within Canada and around the world.

A CPQ government will implement the following policies on public finances.

Keywords:

  • economy

  • public finances

  • taxation

  • individual rights

  • individual responsibility

Resolution #2 - The fiscal balance and debt reduction

Québec is the province where the largest proportion of gross domestic product (GDP) is taken in taxes of all sorts. In addition, Québec government’s net debt is among the highest in North America in share of GDP.

A CPQ government will introduce budgets that are at least balanced (no deficit) that will allow a reduction in the overall tax burden of Québec taxpayers. These budgets will not include increases in total spending and will aim at reductions in these expenses. This, until net debt (accumulated debt) of the Government of Québec has not been reduced as a share of GDP at a level among the lower 25th percentile of North American states and provinces.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • taxation

  • budget balance

  • debt

  • deficit

  • tax burden

Resolution #3 - Spending cuts of the Québec State

We must balance the Québec budget but also ultimately pave the way to begin to repay this huge debt that weighs on the shoulders of future generations.

A CPQ government will exert to reduce state spending by deploying the three axes.

State will:

  • give up some activities that are not essential to its mandate and restrict capital expenditures in its core missions

  • delegate more activities to private enterprise to the extent that it can accomplish the same task more cheaply.

  • review each ministry approach and use their resources to do the same with less.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • taxation

  • expenditure

  • debt

  • capital

Resolution #4 - The financial assistance to businesses and subsidies

Québec pays billions of dollars a year in loans and deferrals and direct subsidies to businesses. The level of support in Québec, when measured per capita, is by some calculations more than four times that of Ontario. This aid and these grants give an unfair competitive advantage to those businesses that have the resources, knowledge and contacts needed to access them, encourage dependence, and create significant distortions the efficient operation of a market economy.

A CPQ government will not pick winning companies from those who want to offer goods and services in a market of healthy competition.

Keywords:

  • economy

  • public finances

  • taxation

  • subsidy

  • tax credit

  • companies

  • competitive advantage

Resolution #5 - State intervention in the economy and Crown corporations

The size of the Québec state and its public and semi-public functions is among the most extensive in North America. State intervention in most sectors of the Québec economy has had the effect of creating an artificial economy often not sustainable in the long term, offering fewer real opportunities to its youngest generation. In addition, the state’s economic involvement generally had as a corollary grant of monopolies to the State in various facets of the economy.

In its first year in office, a CPQ government will review the role and purpose of every governmental organisation that acts in an economic sector, including the corollary existence of a monopoly, to determine if it can:

  • face free competition by private interests;

  • be privatized while subject to free competition in the provision and sale of their property and services;

  • or simply be abolished to allow the recipients of their goods and services available to meet their needs through market functions.

Keywords:

  • economy

  • public finances

  • taxation

  • state size

  • public service

  • monopoly

  • state company

  • competition

Resolution #6 - Hydro-Québec

Before increasing electricity rates as proposed by the Commission Godbout, it would be appropriate to take the necessary measures to increase the productivity of Hydro-Québec. it’s also imperative that the government stop using this crown corporation to distribute grants.

Hydro-Québec could reduce operating costs by reaching the same level of productivity comparable to the private sector, which would increase earnings.

A CPQ government is committed to taking the necessary measures to reduce operating expenses of Hydro-Québec.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • state company

  • hydro-quebec

  • subsidy

  • productivity

Resolution #7 - Société des alcools du Québec (SAQ)

Although the Société des alcools du Québec (SAQ) pays an annual dividend of about one billion dollars to the government, financial performance is poor. The government would increase its annual dividend by $ 300 million if the SAQ reached the level of efficiency of the best food distributors. We will improve the financial performance of the company by abolishing monopoly and allowing private enterprise to compete. This reform will not reduce the revenue that the government receives from the sale of alcohol.

A CPQ government is committed to abolish the monopoly of the SAQ and allow private enterprise to compete.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • state company

  • SAQ

  • competition

Resolution #8 - Payroll taxes

Québec has the highest payroll taxes in Canada. For many, it’s the main factor affecting the growth of small and medium businesses in Québec because they are a tax on human capital and thus hamper job creation for all Quebecers who want to work.

A CPQ government will begin a gradual reduction in payroll taxes with the goal of making Québec payroll taxes among the most competitive in Canada.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • taxation

  • taxes

  • payroll

  • PME

  • human capital

Resolution #9 - User Pays concept

When society decides to allow the State to provide certain goods and services that are qualified as public, it’s a good practice to make their cost reasonably born by individuals who are the primary beneficiaries. This approach reduces wasteful consumption of goods and services provided for free or at a fraction of the real cost and maintains equity between individuals and generations.

A CPQ government will deploy the most realistic possible application of this concept in most goods and services that the Québec government provides but, not increasing the overall tax burden of Québec taxpayers.

Keywords:

  • economy

  • public finances

  • user pays

  • intergenerational equity

  • public services

Resolution #10 - The aggregate compensation of the public service

When a company chooses to provide goods and services to the population through the same employees of the State, it’s essential that these employees are paid properly to achieve quality of service to which the public expects. Additionally, this compensation when considered globally (eg, salary, bonuses, vacation, sick leave, job security, retirement defined benefit plans) doesn’t have to be greater than it would be in the area private for similar circumstances.

A CPQ government will ensure that the total compensation of government employees will now comparable to that offered to private sector employees in similar circumstances or who liken it.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • public service

  • remuneration

Resolution #11 - Labour funds

Labour funds (Fonds de solidarité FTQ, Fondaction CSN) and Capital régional et coopératif Desjardins cost Québec taxpayers 221 M$ in 2012. Only 21% of raised funds were invested in Québec SMEs. Portfolio return is so low that it would be hard pressed to raise capital were it not for the considerable tax advantage it offers, which is paid for directly by the federal and provincial governments. The cost of managing the Fonds de solidarité FTQ was 130 M$ in 2013.

Governance of labour funds is poor. Unions generally do not invest in the funds and yet unions, not investors, appoint fund administrators. And shareholders can not withdraw their funds prior to retirement even if they are dissatisfied with the return on their investment.

A CPQ government will review the rules on workers funds. This revision will include:

  • a cap on underwritten share;

  • a redeployment of labour funds capital;

  • a redefinition of the funds’ mandate to ensure that truly helps Quebec SMEs; and

  • a review of government strategies with a view to encouraging investment in venture capital by promoting a model where business angels and private investors would provide the majority of the development capital.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • workers funds

  • fiscal funds

Resolution #12 - The retail funds

We also propose the abolition of tax credits that benefit the Fondaction and the Fonds de Solidarité FTQ. Both funds have provided investors with their low yields. They do not contribute to increasing the financial literacy of Québeckers as their advertising campaigns primarily based on tax benefits they provide or the fact that they invest in the Québec economy. It’s, generally speaking, not yield, a key reason for investing.

A CPQ government is committed to progressively abolish, over a period of three years, the tax credits enjoyed by retail funds.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • workers funds

  • fiscal funds

Resolution #13 - Scattered support to companies

According to a study for the Commission Robillard, the total financial assistance from the Québec government to economic development reached in 2013-2014, $3.4 billion, and was divided into three categories according to the nature of the aid.

  • Tax assistance reached $2.5 billion, or 73.5% of total aid to economic development;

  • Direct budget support represented $0.5 billion or 14.7% of total aid to economic development;

  • Part of this aid, or $134 million corresponded to loans and loan guarantees, which the leverage is much more important than just budgetary impact;

  • Indirect budget support; that is to say, supporting organizations mandated to support economic development; reached $0.4 billion, or 11.8% of total aid to economic development.

  • Twelve departments and agencies were managing 110 different programs (direct aid and indirect aid) and fifty fiscal measures, and provided support to more than 500 organizations mandated to support businesses in certain areas of intervention.

Also in 2013-2014, with GDP twice as high, Québec provided direct budget support almost as high as in Ontario and higher tax assistance to Ontario tax assistance.

Taxation Québec requires companies a significantly higher tax burden than all other Canadian provinces. This gap represents a higher tax burden of $ 3.0 billion compared to the application in Québec of Ontario’s tax system. The tax burden of Québec companies is twice higher than that of businesses in British Columbia or Alberta

The Couillard government has already reduced by about $600 million in tax assistance for businesses from 2013-2014 to 2015-2016 without touching budget aid that has remained at $552 million in 2015-2016.

A CPQ government is committed to phase out tax incentives and direct and indirect support of business support and use the money saved to reduce their tax burden.

Keywords:

  • economy

  • public finances

  • subsidy

  • warranty

  • economic development

Resolution #14 - Abolish Revenu Québec

According to the Federation of Québec Chambers of Commerce, the Québec coexistence of the two agencies responsible for tax administration, Revenue Québec and the Canada Revenue Agency, represents a duplication would cost between four and five hundred million dollars per year .

The weight of the tax splitting for public administration must be added that for taxpayers. Individuals and companies must fill out two tax returns, dealing with both agencies for audit or dispute. This time spent to comply with two sets of tax obligations could be better spent, especially by small businesses.

A CPQ government is committed to abolish Revenu Québec to reduce state spending four hundred million dollars and to make life easier for taxpayers.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • taxation

  • revenu quebec

  • administration

Resolution #15 - Letting property owners breathe

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will give a little respite to property owners by allowing them to amortize renovation work over 10 years rather than 40 years as is currently the case, so as not to penalize those who undertake major renovation work on their rental properties. It will also allow property owners to demand a security deposit at the signing of a lease.

Finally, a government of the Conservative Party of Québec would abolish the “Act to amend the Civil Code to protect the rights of senior tenants” (2016, chapter 21) (the ‘Act 492’), which prevents the eviction of a tenant aged 70 years or more if he/she refuses to pay his/her rent. This legislation has had the adverse effect of promoting discrimination against our seniors. Since the enactment of this law, many property owners have refused to rent apartments to seniors, especially when they have low income, for fear that they would invoke this law to stop paying their rent.

Keywords:

  • economy

  • housing

  • real estate

Resolution #16 - A group insurance plan for Members of the National Assembly that is fairer to taxpayers

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will require Members of the National Assembly to contribute 50% to the funding of their group insurance plan, as is already the case in most private sector employers, rather than only 12% as is currently the case.

Keywords:

  • public finances

  • national assembly

  • overall remuneration

Resolution #17 - Harmonizing construction standards

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will require all municipalities to adopt the latest version of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC 2015), immediately upon its arrival in power, to harmonize Québec’s construction standards with those of much of the rest of Canada, which will make life easier for entrepreneurs in this sector.

Keywords:

  • building

  • real estate

  • construction

Resolution #18 - Exploring and exploiting the natural resources in Québec’s soil

“Sustainable development” should not be synonymous with “No development”. Funding our social programs and our living standards depends on the responsible exploitation of our natural resources. That’s why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will lift any existing moratorium on the exploration and exploitation of mineral, gas and oil resources in Québec’s territory.

Keywords:

  • economy

  • natural resources

  • environment

  • mining

  • energy

Health

Resolution #19 - Making Québec a Leader in Accessibility Healthcare Services: Distinguishing Between Funding and Delivery of Services

The difference between the funding and the delivery of services must be kept in mind in any discussion regarding the healthcare system.

  • Funding: Doctors fees, hospital fees and other services can be paid either by the public system or by the patient (or their insurer). In Canada, governments pay for approximately 70% of healthcare services. The other 30% is paid by group benefits or by the patient who pays out of their own pocket (for example, prescriptions, dental care, vision care, orthopedics and cosmetic surgery).

  • Delivery: The nature of the public or private sector that delivers these services has nothing to do with the one paying for the services. It rather depends on the ownership and governance of the organization and the employment status of professionals who deliver these services, regardless of who pays for them. In Québec, there are more than 3,000 private health institutions and organizations across the province (medical clinics, whether covered by the RAMQ or not, dental, optometry, rehabilitation, physiotherapy, chiropractic and podiatric clinics, dietary services, audiology, dentures, optical, private medical laboratories, orthotics and prosthesis, and home care, etc…).

Keywords:

  • health

  • funding

  • benefit

Resolution #20 - Pay Hospitals on an Activity-Based Funding Model to Foster Competition

Most hospitals in Québec and in Canada receive funding through overall budgets which are primarily determined by historical reasons. In an ever-expanding system, this form of funding leads to rationing, and hospitals have no choice but to restrict admissions. There is no incentive for hospital managers to reform the system in order to reduce costs and to improve access and wait times.

Instead, hospitals should be paid per treatment, on an activity-based funding model as it’s currently done in Scandinavian countries and in England. The amount paid to a hospital should be the equivalent of the average cost to perform the treatment in question in Québec. This amount should be adjusted by taking into account a range of factors that are proper to each institution and patient, such as the geographical location, the individual characteristics of each patient, etc. Regular audits of at least 5% of all transactions will be performed to ensure that hospitals do not overcharge the province. Since the money will follow the patient, hospitals will be encouraged to expand their services to increase revenue. This formula also encourages hospitals whose costs are higher than average to improve their performance by adopting better practices. The growth in activity resulting from such an approach also means that patients will be treated more quickly, access to healthcare services will be improved and waiting lists decreased.

Does activity-based funding lead to cutbacks on the quality of services by healthcare institutions in order to reduce costs? Quite the contrary, insofar as revenues depend on the number of patients they attract, it’s imperative for them to offer quality services and maintain a good reputation. In addition, any hospital which readmits a patient for the same condition within 30 days of their last hospital visit must do so free of charge. In due course, we will look to extend activity-based funding to other activities, such as primary care and home care.

Keywords:

  • health

  • care episode

  • hospitals

  • competition

Resolution #21 - Establish a Ranking System of Québec Hospitals

In a competitive environment, for consumers to make an informed decision about their hospital. They need to have access to the proper information. Hospital ratings will be compiled and made public annually. They will include performance indicators based on clinical outcomes and the quality of care and hospital services. This rating will create emulation and competition between hospitals.

Keywords:

  • health

  • hospitals

  • competition

  • ranking

Resolution #22 - Encourage New Forms of Management and Hospital Ownership

We will encourage the emergence of new ways to manage and own hospitals. These may include public hospitals whose management will be delegated following a public tender or new hospitals belonging to non-profit cooperatives and community organizations or for-profit businesses.

Keywords:

  • health

  • hospitals

  • competition

  • management

  • property

  • cooperative

  • organization

Resolution #23 - Change the Remuneration of physicians in hospital

Hospitals will be funded on an activity basis and physicians who practise in hospitals will be remunerated by those hospitals. Hospitals will sign service agreements with doctors, in which both the physician fees and their working conditions will be established. Such a system will encourage greater flexibility and competitiveness in the medical field.

Keywords:

  • health

  • hospitals

  • doctors

  • remuneration

  • care episode

Resolution #24 - Liberalize Medical Practices

It will be possible for doctors to work in the private sector without being obliged to disaffiliate from the RAMQ and the public system. This liberalization will occur only if certain conditions are met to ensure that the public system is not stripped of its current resources.

Contrary to common belief, there are available unused resources which can serve the private sector without affecting the public sector. For example, in 2008 it was estimated that more than half (51%) of Québec specialists were willing to work an additional 4 hours weekly in the private sector. These same specialists agreed to be under an obligation to provide a minimum of a 35- hour work week in the public sector before being allowed to work in the private sector.

Keywords:

  • health

  • hospitals

  • doctors

  • remuneration

  • private practice

  • RAMQ

Resolution #25 - Allow Private Insurance

A “duplicative” insurance is an insurance which covers medical care for people who continue to have access to the public system (and who are forced to contribute to it with their tax dollars) but also wish to have complementary treatment in the private sector. This type of insurance is currently illegal in Québec and should be allowed so as to permit middle-class patients, who wouldn’t otherwise have the means, to have access to private treatment. This will represent additional funding for the healthcare system without being a tax or a mandatory “fee” levied on taxpayers!

Keywords:

  • health

  • insurance

Resolution #26 - Long-Term Care

In Québec, unlike the situation in the rest of Canada and the world, most nursing homes are owned by the public sector. This situation forces the government to maintain an expensive real estate. In other Canadian provinces, private, community and municipal players all have a major role in nursing homes.

We will implement the following principle: healthcare should be provided through the public healthcare system while housing should be left to licensed community players, non-profit organizations, cooperatives, private companies and municipalities. In short, the role of the public healthcare system is to treat and not to house.

Before proceeding with such a change, the ministry must first adopt strict accreditation rules and procedures to ensure the safety of persons and the quality of services.

Our priorities will therefore be the following:

  • To prioritize home care;

  • To ensure universal coverage of medical, nursing and housing services by the public system and, optionally, by a complementary private plan. Other home care services for assistance in daily activities and domestic help will continue to be the subject of graduated coverage depending on the degree of dependency and of the nature of the service, and the ability to pay (in all cases, the poorest should be protected);

  • To allow a patient to receive either a cash payment or a tax credit so they can choose the provider of their choice;

  • To review the sums paid or the amount of tax credits offered to recipients of home care so that they can cover a larger portion of the fees charged by intermediate resources and contracted private CHSLDs;

  • To provide an expansion and diversification of accommodation and housing to intermediate or family-type resources;

  • To entrust management of CHSLDs by licensing or franchising to for-profit or non-profit organizations within five years;

  • To adjust the contributions required by persons currently accommodated according to their ability to pay in order to better reflect the real cost of food and lodging. Such an adjustment would restore fairness compared with persons who reside in their homes at their expense; and

  • To allow a patient, who is not housed in a public CHSLD within a period of 72 hours after being discharged from hospital by their physician, to require a government performance guarantee to find them a place in another home other than a CHSLD, at the expense of the government.

Keywords:

  • health

  • CHSLD

  • home maintenance

Resolution #27 - Interdisciplinarity

A Conservative Party of Québec government will foster interdisciplinarity for primary care.

Keywords:

  • health

Resolution #28 - Empowering individuals to donate organs and tissues

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will make the following amendments to article 2.0.8 of the Act facilitating organ and tissue donations:

  • For the purposes of the fourth paragraph of article 2, any person may, at any time from his application for registration with the Régie in accordance with section 9 of the Health Insurance Act (chapter A-29), express in writing, on a form provided for this purpose by the Régie, his/her willingness to no longer authorize the removal of organs or tissues from his/her body after its death for transplant, as permitted by section 43 of the Civil Code of Québec. This consent may be terminated at any time, in writing, using a form provided to that end by the Régie. This amendment will result in changes to other laws: the Health Services and Social Services Act, the Labour Standards Act and the Régie de l’assurance maladie du Québec act.

Keywords:

  • health

  • donation organs

  • tissue donation

  • RAMQ

Resolution #29 - Treatment drugs for cancer

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will make eligible for reimbursement by the RAMQ’s pharmacare drugs for cancer treatment, after payment of the deductible for those who will have the means to do so.

Keywords:

  • health

  • cancer

  • drug insurance

Resolution #30 - Health Commissioner

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will recreate the position of Health Commissioner, which was abolished by the Liberal government of Philippe Couillard. The Health Commissioner was responsible for assessing the results achieved by the health and social services system, taking into account all the interactive systemic elements of the latter and to provide the population with the necessary elements for a comprehensive understanding of the actions taken by the Government in the light of the major issues in health and social services. The Health Commissioner was as important to our health care system as the office of the Auditor General is to our public finances, as it was closely monitored by an organization that had enough elbow room and that did not depend on the Health Minister themselves.

Keywords:

  • health

  • transparency

  • accountability

Education

Resolution #31 - Giving Back Control of our Schools to Parents

The findings abound regarding the failures of our educational system, at our primary level and especially at the secondary level. These include high dropout rates, particularly with boys, low rate of high school graduation, a centralized bureaucratic system that is too often disconnected from reality, and a decrease in the accountability of principals. It’s a race to the bottom, with evaluation methods that do not encourage effort or reward individual success and the pursuit of excellence. Teachers are often unmotivated and disempowered, forced to replace proven traditional teaching methods by a bureaucrat-imposed curriculum. As we can see, the list is long.

Nevertheless, our schools are full of good school principals and of worthy teachers who want their students to succeed. But the current system doesn’t recognize the merit of those whose pupils achieve significant progress while rewarding those who blindly follow the bureaucratic rules of the ministry.

To remodel or revitalize our education system, it’s necessary to ensure that the needs of students and the constructive action of parents are at the heart of the schools. Parents and their children must be the primary and ultimate focus of managers of primary and secondary schools.

Keywords:

  • education

  • autonomy

  • graduation

Resolution #32 - Autonomous Schools, French School Boards Abolished

A CPQ government will increase the responsibilities of institutional councils in schools to transform them into true boards of directors. We will also strengthen the role of principals so that they can fully exercise their leadership in teaching and administration.

The task of hiring and evaluating teachers, professionals and support staff will be given back to the school principals. Principals will negotiate the compensation of staff with their respective unions or directly with non-union personnel and may, in the context of a fair assessment, dismiss those who do not have the required skills. Schools will rent their premises from the Ministry or from other agencies or they can buy them. They will manage their buildings and the required transportation for their students. We aim to create autonomous schools, close to the population they serve, in a decentralized management context.

French school boards will be abolished; English school boards will be kept, as mandated by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Property taxes will be reserved exclusively for municipalities. The abolition will not, however, impact the financial situation of the province.

Keywords:

  • education

  • school board

Resolution #33 - A More Focused Mandate for the Ministry

The Ministry of Education will continue to establish the general framework (mission, overall objectives and learner profiles) of Québec education network. It will also set specifications per cycle that will contain the minimum teaching standards in elementary and secondary schools. However, the curriculum will be decided by the principals and their teachers. The process of school accountability to the Ministry, which is very cumbersome and bureaucratic, will be streamlined.

Keywords:

  • education

  • ministry of education

Resolution #34 - An Independent Review Panel

An evaluation committee (reporting to the National Assembly and not the Ministry) will set the standards to be attained at the primary and the secondary levels, and will gradually raise them. It will also be responsible for devising and administering national tests, will be responsible for grading these tests, will publish the results of these tests aggregated by school and will compile and publish individual school performance (quality at entry, retention and graduation rates, and graduate outcomes in the following cycle).

Keywords:

  • education

  • ministry of education

  • national assembly

  • evaluation

Resolution #35 - An Understandable Report Card

The Committee will ensure that a uniform, clear and numbered report card will be accessible for parents.

Keywords:

  • education

  • bulletin

Resolution #36 - A Competitive Approach in School Funding

While preserving the universal access to education, A CPQ government advocates a funding method that puts parents at the forefront. This funding method is based on a universal system of school vouchers, as experienced in New Zealand, Denmark and Sweden, among other countries. Through these school vouchers, any parent of a child enrolled in elementary or secondary school may choose a public school in their district, a school in the neighbouring district or a private school (profit or non-profit) of their choice. All parents will receive the same amount of money per child enrolled regardless of the chosen school. The value of the voucher will be adjusted according to grade level, geography, learning and adaptation difficulties of students, etc.

The Ministry of Education already uses a similar formula to fund universities and CEGEPs. In fact, post-secondary students choose their programs at their CEGEP or university and these post-secondary establishments receive a subsidy equal to the number of courses taken by those enrolled in the program at a particular time. In exercising these choices, students make universities and CEGEPs compete.

Universal school vouchers will be available to all parents. Parental choice is likely to increase the quality of schools since better schools will receive higher funding. It seems obvious that schools that offer the best training and those best suited to the needs of students will be chosen more often.

Keywords:

  • education

  • funding

  • learning bonds

Resolution #37 - Teachers: Independent Professionals

Ministry officials will no longer prescribe teaching methods. It will be up to teachers, in conjunction with school principals, to adopt the methods they deem the most efficient. This freedom will diversify the supply of educational services to parents.

Teacher training will be reviewed to allow high school principals to hire graduates with a Bachelor degree who have also obtained a one-year certificate in education or have acquired an equivalent ability. The possibility to repeat a grade will be reintroduced for every school year.

Keywords:

  • education

  • teachers

Resolution #38 - Technical Training in CEGEP

We will maintain the technical training programs and adult training programs in CEGEPs. However, we will abolish the general program. High school students will now complete a sixth preparatory year in high school and will have an additional year of university for general education.

The managers of CEGEPs will become more autonomous. They will be encouraged to develop innovative programs leading to a college degree, such as was done with the International Baccalaureate.

Quality indicators will be developed and publicized to create competition between CEGEPs and allow students to be better informed when choosing a CEGEP.

Keywords:

  • education

  • cegep

Resolution #39 - Deregulating university Tuition

Tuition fees for universities other than Université du Québec will be deregulated. Universities belonging to the Réseau de l’Université du Québec will be allowed to gradually adjust their fees up to a maximum of 40% of the costs of each program or university faculty. In return, loan and scholarship programs will be adjusted so that deserving students continue to have access to higher education.

Keywords:

  • education

  • university

  • tuition fees

Resolution #40 - Students Free to Join a Student Association

The Act regarding the accreditation and financing of students’ associations will be amended to allow a student to decide not to be a member of an association or be represented by it; and in such a case, students will no longer be obliged to contribute to these associations.

Keywords:

  • education

  • student association

  • freedom of association

Resolution #41 - Repeal of The book Act - Regulations on the acquisition of books by certain persons from accredited bookstores

A CPQ government will repeal the Act which requires schools to purchase books and textbooks at high prices from accredited bookstores, to promote competition and lower acquisition costs.

Keywords:

  • education

  • textbooks

Resolution #42 - Competition among music schools abroad

To enable competition with major music schools in the world and allow more flexibility in hiring teachers.

A CPQ government will ensure that conservatories of music and drama are converted chartered institutions such as universities.

Keywords:

  • education

  • music schools

Resolution #43 - Ethics and Religious Culture course (ECR)

A CPQ government will abolish the course on ethics and religious culture, and replace this course by a civic education course to better prepare young people for adult life.

Keywords:

  • education

  • ethics and religious culture

  • citizenship education

Family

Resolution #44 - Daycares

A CPQ government wishes to give to all parents of preschoolers free choice in child care. It will provide, by the end of its first mandate, an allocation of $100 per week per eligible child for child care. This allowance, which could be taxable, will be paid to either parent of the child Parents can then choose for their child the type of care that best suits them. It goes without saying that parents who choose private subsidized daycare or CPE will see the daily amount of $7.00 that they spend per child in care gradually increase as the weekly allowance also increases. Of course, the subsidy amount paid to subsidized daycares and the CPE will be adjusted accordingly. When this allocation will reach $100.00 per week, the daily rate will be deregulated and daycares may determine the price they charge for their services.

Any qualified people may open a daycare in accordance with government standards if they are able to finance it. Waiting lists will quickly disappear while competition among daycare centers will allow parents to have more choice in the operating hours and on the nature of the services offered.

The Ministry of Family, freed from the obligation of monitoring compliance with the pricing policy of $7.00 per day, will be able to devote more effort to inspect daycares to ensure suitable environment for children who attend them.

Keywords:

  • family

  • daycare

  • child care services

  • CPE

Resolution #45 - Caregivers

People with disabilities, regardless of their age, and the elderly can often rely on caregivers to avoid institutionalized accommodation. The amount paid to caregivers is much lower than the costs incurred when the disabled or elderly choose to live in an institution.

A CPQ government will review the financial assistance to caregivers to facilitate this choice whenever possible.

Keywords:

  • family

  • caregivers

Resolution #46 - Breastfeeding of newborn babies

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will abolish the “Amis des bébés” Initiative in Québec’s hospitals and birth homes, and leave it up to mothers to freely choose how they will breastfeed their newborns.

Keywords:

  • family

  • maternity

  • breastfeeding

Governance

Resolution #47 - A Strong and Democratic Government

Québec is over-governed. Québec citizens elect 78 federal MPs, 125 provincial MNAs, municipal councillors, school trustees and hundreds of board members of health institutions.

In spite of all these democratic structures, Québec state apparatus is extremely centralized and leaves little manoeuvring room to various local governments. In addition to fixing the maximum school tax rate, the Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports also controls educational programs, leaving school boards little autonomy. The Ministry of Health and Social Services manages its own network of establishments in a very centralized manner, also leaving little leeway for institutions and their boards. Whether in the field of health or education, the working conditions of the staff, doctors, nurses, teachers or clerks are negotiated on a provincial level with little consideration for regional needs.

Municipalities have a little more autonomy since they have their own taxing powers. However, their own revenue source represents only half of their income. They rely on the federal and provincial governments to balance the budget. The province’s role has greatly increased in Québec during the last half-century since the Québec Government has used the weakness in municipalities’ tax base to take over municipal programs.

A CPQ government wishes to draw on the experience of countries such as Sweden and Germany. These countries have reformed their health and educational systems by adopting new forms of funding that promote better use of available resources and greater autonomy of local government while increasing the accessibility and quality of services offered.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • members

  • democracy

  • centralization

  • autonomy

  • administrative regions

  • decentralization

  • taxation

  • funding

Resolution #48 - Allow Internet voting

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will ask the Chief Electoral Officer to produce a feasibility study on implementing Internet voting in Québec (which would coexist with traditional paper ballots), possibly with a pilot project for schoolboard elections, and then file a report on this at the National Assembly.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • vote

  • election

  • democracy

  • technology

Resolution #49 - Creating the Position of Parliamentary Director of Public Finance

Experience teaches us that successive governments have not always been rigorous in preparing budgets submitted to the National Assembly. It has often been the norm to underestimate the costs generated by a Bill submitted to the National Assembly for adoption. In order to improve the quality of democratic debates in Québec, A CPQ government will propose the appointment of a Parliamentary Director of Public Finance. This person will be appointed for a five-year term by a two-thirds majority of the National Assembly.

The Parliamentary Director of Finance will have the mandate to present to Parliament an independent analysis of the financial condition of Québec and of the Budget as well as a forecast of the Québec economy. The Director will also prepare an analysis of the financial impact of any Bill submitted to Québec National Assembly. The publication of this analysis should precede the Bill’s second reading before the National Assembly.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • budgets

  • public finances

Resolution #50 - Reducing the Number of Members of the National Assembly

In an effort to further reduce unnecessary costs, we propose to adopt the federal electoral map for provincial elections. Taxpayers will be saving the expense associated with maintaining a separate electoral map in addition to saving the much larger sums required to fund the services of 47 members of the National Assembly and their staff, whose services will no longer be required.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • members

  • voting mode

Resolution #51 - International anti-corruption standards

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will adopt an international anti-corruption standard(s), such as ISO 37001 or the anti-corruption elements of the Global reporting Initiative (GRI 205), for the entire Québec government.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • corruption

  • standards

Resolution #52 - Reducing the number of Administrative Regions

The last complete reform of the Province’s administrative regions dates back to 1987. Since then, major advances in information and communications technologies (ICT), such as teleconferences and cloud computing, have made possible the administration of vaster regions with fewer resources.

For this reason, a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will reduce the number of administrative regions in Québec from 17 to 9:

  • Abitibi-Outaouais,

  • Bas-Saint-Laurent–Gaspésie,

  • Capitale-nationale–Chaudière-Appalaches,

  • Laurentides-Lanaudière,

  • Montérégie-Estrie,

  • Montréal-Laval,

  • Mauricie–Centre-du-Québec, and

  • Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean–Côte-Nord.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • administrative regions

  • technology

Resolution #53 - Strong Local Administrations

We wish to support strong and well-funded local governments to deliver better services to Quebecers. We therefore propose a major reform in Québec public administration, which revolves around these following pillars:

  • property taxes will be reserved to municipalities;

  • revenue raised through vehicle registration will be transferred to municipalities which will in turn determine the cost of vehicle registration;

  • grants to municipal programs will be reduced;

  • the provincial government will support municipal governments in their effort to better control the costs of their compensation policy;

  • the provincial government will take the necessary measures to ensure that the transfer of services will be completed without increasing costs to municipalities; and

  • the boards of health and education institutions will include a majority of people who are not employees of the institution.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • property tax

  • municipality

  • registration

Resolution #54 - New Source of Revenue for Municipalities

In 2008, Québec municipalities spent $4.3 billion for transportation and communication which represents $1.9 billion more than the expenditures of the provincial government in 2011-2012 for the same purpose. The provincial government has collected from motorists $460 million more than what was spent on the provincial grade road maintenance in that year. Municipalities, which are spending more than the provincial government in this area, receive only a fraction of the taxes paid by motorists. The time has come to correct the imbalance.

A CPQ government proposes to transfer to municipalities all fees collected from vehicle registration which amounted to $684 million in 2011-2012. In return, municipalities will take full responsibility for the construction and the maintenance of secondary roads

Keywords:

  • governance

  • municipality

  • transport

Resolution #55 - Better Performance in the Management of Municipal Services

Ten years ago, the United Kingdom adopted a mechanism called “value maximization”. The aim is to optimize the delivery of municipal services by using the most efficient suppliers. Maximizing value is a flexible approach that doesn’t presume that municipal services must necessarily be provided by the local government if other more effective mechanisms exist. While not mandatory, competition thus remains an important management tool.

British municipal governments have the obligation to review the effectiveness of their delivery of services every five years and must:

  • consider the option of competition for services for whic. They are responsible;

  • compare their performance to national indicators;

  • question their service delivery methods and

  • consult with taxpayers about their quality standards and delivery methods

A CPQ government will arrange for Québec municipalities to adopt, with full transparency, this method of management which would improve quality and cost effectiveness of municipal services in Québec.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • municipal services

  • competition

Resolution #56 - Bringing back municipal referendums

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will re-introduce municipal referendums to authorize major loans and decisions in a municipality, even if the reimbursement of the loan is provided through the general income of the municipality, or even if it is entirely financed by the owners of buildings of the entire territory of the municipality, or even if the expenses foreseen in a loan are subsidized at 50% or more by the Government or by one of its ministers or agencies.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • referendum

  • democracy

  • loan

Resolution #57 - Abolition of Boroughs

Province of Québec has no city large enough to be divided into boroughs. New York has 2 boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, which are more populated than the entire city of Montreal. Both Chicago and Toronto have about 2.7 million inhabitants, which is 1 million inhabitants more than Montreal, and neither of them are subdivided into boroughs. Furthermore, the more complex and multi-tiered a government bureaucracy is, the more responsibility is diffused, and the more elected officials have others to blame when an administrative problem arises. Finally, all mid-and large-sized Québec cities have more elected officials than similarly-sized cities elsewhere in Canada, and none of the former are better governed than the latter.

That’s why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will abolish boroughs in all Québec cities that have them.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • boroughs

  • cities

Resolution #58 - Pension Plan of Members of the National Assembly

Members of the National Assembly receive generous pensions in comparison to the average Québec worker, and taxpayers pay dearly for this pension.

Pensions plan for Members of the National Assembly has several advantages: the Member of the National Assembly can retire at 60 years of age although the normal retirement age is 65. They can also receive their pension even if they has not reached 60 years of age. This generosity is even more tangible in regard to pension credits, which amount to 4% per year, while the most generous private plans are limited to 2%. Therefore, after 25 years of service, the Member’s pension may reach 100% of their salary.

Taxpayers fund most of these generous benefits since MNA’s pay less than one quarter of the cost of the plan.

A CPQ government will reform the system by delaying the normal retirement age to 67 years of age, limiting pensions credit to 2% per annum. Pensions will not exceed 70% of the salary and Members of the National Assembly will be required to pay half the cost of their plan.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • members

Resolution #59 - A Limit of 20 ministers

There are currently 24 Members in the Council of ministers, which represents 40% of all MNA’s of the party that forms the government. This is not a record since at one time the number of ministers reached 36. We are proposing elsewhere in this Program to reduce the number of Members to 78 once we have introduced reforms that will strengthen governance and accountability of local governments.

A CPQ government will limit to 20 the number of ministers and junior ministers.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • ministers

Resolution #60 - Resigning Members and Defectors

A Member who voluntarily resigns should not be entitled to a severance package or a transition bonus. A CPQ government will abolish these payments upon a voluntary resignation.

When an elector votes in an election. They chooses as a representative not only one of their co-citizens, but also a political party. This is why many believe that there is a moral contract between the elected representative and the constituents who gave them a mandate based on a specific political agenda.

In order to restore the people’s confidence in their representatives, A CPQ government proposes to modify the Elections Act. The amendment will require an official elected under the banner of a given political party to resign should they decide to change political affiliation before the end of their mandate.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • members

Resolution #61 - Société des établissements de plein air du Québec (SEPAQ)

A CPQ government will review the mission and relevance of SEPAQ.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • SEPAQ

  • environment

Resolution #62 - Transparency in public administration

A CPQ government will support any political initiative to introduce greater transparency in public administration, and regardless of the level of government or the union.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • transparency

A CPQ government will implement a mechanism of popular initiative to force a recall election if one member has a severe failure in the exercise of its functions, has a serious attendance problem, is unavailable to their constituents or if the member wants to change political party.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • reminder

  • members

Resolution #64 - Data processing

A CPQ government will promote the use of free software and software complying with the documentation standards by the public service, with the aim to reduce the state’s reliance on sole suppliers, privative license contracts and expensive alternatives reducing its ability to take advantage of a free market mechanism and a skilled internal workforce and jeopardizing the sustainability of the information produced by the State.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • computer

  • free software

  • documentation

  • technology

Resolution #65 - Commission of the National Capital

A CPQ government will abolish the Commission of the National Capital, which is no longer necessary because Québec City can perfectly handle the promotional and tourism component.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • municipal

  • quebec city

Resolution #66 - Department of International Relations

A CPQ government will abolish the Ministry of International Relations, close all Québec delegations abroad without exception, will repatriate the delegates and their staff (with compensation) and will dispose of the leases and buildings concerned.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • international relations

Resolution #67 - Open Data

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will publish, in open and easy to search databases for citizens and IT systems, data on:

  • First, all the expenses of MNAs and their staff at the National Assembly, as well as all the salaries, bonuses and benefits granted to all senior executives in the public service.

  • Then, in accordance with the Open Data Barometer : All historical, current and projected data concerning:

    • mapping of the Province’s territory.

    • land registers.

    • demography.

    • the income and expenditure of the State, including all salaries, all proposals received for tenders and all subsidies paid.

    • the register of businesses, including the surname and first name of directors and their role.

    • all legislation.

    • the state of provincial transportation networks and utilities.

    • international trade agreements as well as trade volumes.

    • the healthcare system’s performance.

    • the performance of primary, secondary and college school networks.

    • crime statistics, including the list of wanted criminals and individuals considered dangerous.

    • environmental and public health statistics.

    • electoral results.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • open data

  • technology

  • computer

  • transparency

Resolution #68 - Ballot initiatives

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will create a referendum mechanism that can be triggered when an official petition of the National Assembly reaches 100,000 signatures of registered voters. The petition must be sponsored either by a member of the National Assembly or by the Citizen’s Protector.

A period of 20 years will be prescribed for questions of a constitutional nature, while those on any other topic will not be able to be the subject of a referendum of popular initiative before a 5-year period has elapsed.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • referendum

  • democracy

Resolution #69 - Public register of contracts granted without tender

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will publish online information on all contractors and suppliers who are awarded contracts without bidding.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • contract

  • call for bids

Resolution #70 - Accountability of provincial public service employees

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will make provincial public service employees more accountable when they are responsible for misconduct leading to the prosecution of their employer. In term, this should create a culture of respect for the citizen within the public service.

Keywords:

  • governance

  • accountability

  • transparency

Labour

Resolution #71 - Giving Back Control of Unions to Employees

Because we care so much about liberty, we favour the possibility for employees to form an employee association. Being represented by a union is very legitimate to the extent it’s the result of a voluntary contractual relationship between employees.

Over the years, the individual right of employees to form an association has become a collective right that now restricts individual rights. The right not to associate is no longer recognized. In addition, unions have lost sight of their core mission which is to represent their members in the negotiation of the work conditions. Unionized employees have lost control of their unions and it’s time to give it back to them.

Keywords:

  • work

  • association

  • union

Resolution #72 - The Right to Work

“Closed Shop” provisions force employers to hire employees who are members of a union at the time of hiring. It thereby undermines the freedom of those who do not wish to be part of a union.

A CPQ government will amend the Labour Code to make this clause illegal.

Keywords:

  • work

  • labour code

  • union

  • closed workshop

Resolution #73 - Union Transparency and Financial Disclosure

A CPQ government will protect the freedoms of unionized employees and their right of association by imposing the obligation of annual financial disclosure on Québec unions.

This measure of transparency and public accountability will also restore confidence in Québec union apparatus in favour of unionized Québec employees.

We will also demand that all union members or all people solicited to become union members have simple and anonymous access (i.e. Ministry of Labour’s website) to the documents filed in connection with the application for certification by both the union and the employer, to the certification certificate and to the union’s constitution and by-laws, as well as those of the union federation to which it’s affiliated.

This will allow members and prospective members to know what their financial obligations are (or will be), what rules members are expected to follow and what the political and organizational goals of the union are.

Keywords:

  • work

  • union

  • transparency

  • disclosure

Resolution #74 - Free Choice in the Use of Union Dues

The Rand formula forces employees to pay dues. This fact is justified because all unionized employees, union members or not, benefit from the union’s negotiation of the collective agreement.

Unionized workers forced to pay union dues, however, should have the right to demand that their dues not be used to finance activities other than direct representation related to union negotiations and the administration of their collective agreement. It’s interesting to note that the CNTU has already taken a step in this direction by instituting in its charter that union dues can’t be used to support a political party.

A CPQ government will protect the rights and freedoms of unionized members by limiting their obligation to pay union dues to that portion only that is used exclusively for the negotiation and the administration of labour conditions.

Thus, union campaigns based on political or ideological grounds will now be funded by voluntary contributions from union members rather than being covered by the Rand formula.

Keywords:

  • work

  • union

  • union dues

  • working relationships

  • rand formula

Resolution #75 - A Secret Ballot for Union Certification and to Maintain It

A union may file an application for certification with the Commission des relations du travail without holding a secret ballot if more than 50% of employees have signed a membership card. Since Saskatchewan adopted the systematic use of secret ballots in 2007, Québec remains one in a minority of provinces to still allow this practice.

We are naturally in favour of the right of association. This fundamental right is protected under the Canadian Constitution and the Québec Charter of Rights and Freedoms. However, only a secret ballot, administered by an independent ballot, will allow employees to freely and democratically express their fundamental right to associate with a union, or not.

Moreover, the provisions of the Labour Code dealing with the right granted to unionized employees to decertify during the so-called period of raiding are not well understood. If union members were informed of this right at the appropriate time, they would be given the freedom to exercise their choice. If a significant number so desired, a vote on decertification would be required.

A CPQ government will protect the rights and freedoms of workers by amending the Labour Code:

  • To require a secret ballot for any application for certification, even when the number of signed cards exceeds half of the membership;

  • To require a secret ballot on whether or not to maintain the certification, within each of the periods provided in the accreditation certificate.

Keywords:

  • work

  • union

  • democracy

  • secret ballot

Resolution #76 - Strike Votes and Ratification Votes

The Labour Code is silent on the obligation to hold a strike vote or a vote on the ratification of the collective agreement.

A CPQ government will add a provision in the Labour Code for a secret ballot fifteen days prior to the beginning of a strike and for a secret ballot to ratify a collective agreement. All employees included in the bargaining unit will have a right to vote. The strike vote will need to be renewed every thirty (30) days.

Keywords:

  • work

  • union

  • strike

  • collective bargain

Resolution #77 - Reducing Construction Costs

The construction sector represents about 15% of Québec GDP. Not less than twenty-six construction trades (with mandatory certification and unionization) are described, accredited and regulated by the Commission de la construction du Québec.

The number and categories of trades and the regulations that oversee their activities have the effect of increasing the labour shortage of skilled workers (since most tradesmen have only one trade) and impeding productivity. Tradesmen must hold many work certificates to be able to accomplish relatively simple or similar tasks to those they have already been trained for (a plumber that can’t plug an electric cord, an electrician can’t move a ladder or a piece of furniture, a carpenter can’t pour a small quantity of cement, etc.).

This lack of flexibility forces general contractors to hire a multitude of specialised trade workers who exercise only one trade or many subcontractors companies who will be limited to working only on a small portion of a specific construction project. Construction projects or sites become much more cumbersome and difficult to manage for employers.

A CPQ government will end this segregation between Québec tradesmen in the construction industry.

The number of trades with mandatory certification recognized by law will be reduced and others will be regrouped to allow for greater trade flexibility and versatility.

A CPQ government will align Québec rules with the standards in Ontario (which has six trades).

This reform will increase the productivity of the construction by $600 million a year for the benefit of the Québec economy.

Keywords:

  • work

  • construction

  • ccq

Resolution #78 - Hiring Replacement Workers

Québec and British Columbia are the only two jurisdictions in North America that do not allow the hiring of replacement workers. To prevent a citizen access to employment when they is willing to accept the wage and working conditions offered by an employer undermines their right and their individual freedom to work.

A CPQ government will amend the Labour Code accordingly.

Keywords:

  • work

  • labour code

  • replacement

Resolution #79 - Government Services are Essential Services

A CPQ government will declare that government services, when they are provided exclusively by the public sector, are essential services for the population.

The right to strike of public employees who provide these services will be removed. Why? A strike in the public sector monopoly has negative consequences for the entire population. Not only does it deprive citizens of its essential services, but it’s the whole population who, through additional taxation, will pay for the eventual outcome. For their part, the strikers are unlikely to put their employer in any financial difficulties since their strike reduces its spending. This will also apply to the part of the public sector that provides commercial services such as the production of electricity or the sale of alcohol, if the province has a monopoly of this service.

In contrast, in the private sector, the shareholders and the strikers take significant risks. The first, by having their company’s competitiveness weakened through the strike and the latter because the strike endangers their long-term job security. These two opposing forces are thus brought together to quickly force an acceptable compromise. This balance of power is not available in the public sector.

Strikes in the public sector often have adverse effects on the poor, since they can’t afford the existing available alternatives in the private sector. For example, the harm of transit strike is felt greater by the poor who rely on public transportation to commute than wealthier citizens who own their own cars. A minimum wage worker can lose half a day’s salary if they needs to take a taxi during a transit strike. This same worker may lose their entire day’s wage if they can’t find someone to watch their children if there is a CPE strike.

Keywords:

  • work

  • monopoly

  • essential services

Resolution #80 - Tax Deductions of Union Dues Used for Political Purposes

Québec tax legislation doesn’t provide tax credits or tax deductions to any taxpayer who contributes to a political party. These donations are limited to $100 annually. There is no reason why unions who devote enormous resources to political activities would collect these resources with the support of the Québec Ministry of Revenue.

A CPQ government will abolish the tax deduction for the portion of dues used for purposes other than union representation.

Keywords:

  • work

  • union dues

Resolution #81 - The Abolition of the Act respecting collective agreement decrees

The Act respecting collective agreement decrees forces workers to form and join unions, and removes the option to de-unionize.

A CPQ government will abolish the collective agreement decrees Act.

Keywords:

  • work

  • union

Resolution #82 - The Abolition of the Workforce Training Tax

The Québec government is paternalistic towards business by levying a 1% of a company’s payroll if it can’t prove that it has spent at least that amount towards training its workforce. In a market economy such as Québec, employers should determine the resources allocated towards training their staff, as they do for all their other production costs. If their workforce is not sufficiently trained. They will suffer the consequences through a loss of customers or by not remaining competitive. The government doesn’t need to intervene.

A CPQ government will abolish the tax dedicated to the training of the workforce at day 1.

Keywords:

  • work

  • payroll

  • training

Resolution #83 - Abolishing the obligation to create a Voluntary Retirement Savings Plan (VRSP)

All Québec companies with five or more employees who do not offer a pension plan must set up a VRSP. Just like the 1% payroll tax for employee training, this is yet another costly compliance obligation for Québec companies, and it does not bring any added value to workers, who can already save freely by themselves.

Keywords:

  • work

  • retirement

  • VRSP

Resolution #84 - Allowing volunteer work in construction

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will allow volunteers to work in the construction or renovation of any public institution (school, hospital, library, arena, etc.), once it has been approved by Management, in all areas covered by the construction industry decree.

Keywords:

  • work

  • volunteer

  • construction

Resolution #85 - True equality in the Québec public service

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec pledges never to impose gender-based hiring quotas in the Québec public service. This policy will remain in force as long as it has not been demonstrated beyond a reasonable doubt that a gender disparity in a particular trade or profession within the public service is directly caused by discrimination that still exists against one of the two sexes.

In the same vein, a government of the Conservative Party of Québec would abolish affirmative action policies that promote employment of visible minorities in the Québec public service, as long as it has not been demonstrated beyond a reasonable doubt that a disparity between Quebeckers from a visible minority and other Quebeckers in a given trade or profession within the public service is directly caused by discrimination that remains against this visible minority.

All the measures put in place by the Government of Québec to welcome and ensure the full contribution of employees suffering from physical or intellectual disabilities will be retained.

Keywords:

  • work

  • quotas

  • public service

Justice and Public Safety

Resolution #86 - Justice and public safety: A Humane but Firm Justice

One of the most fundamental missions of a government is the administration of justice, both civil and criminal, as well as the protection of our institutions, our way of life and the security of our citizens. In the framework of the Canadian federal system, justice is a jurisdiction that is shared between the federal government and the provinces and territories. The criminal code falls under federal jurisdiction while the administration of justice comes under provincial and territorial jurisdiction, including the civil and criminal courts within its territory.

The federal government manages the penitentiaries that accommodate people serving a sentence of two years or more. It has also created Parole Boards, who have the exclusive authority to grant, deny, cancel or revoke day parole or full parole to inmates in federal prisons. The board can also order inmates to serve their full sentence.

The provinces, for their part, are responsible for those who have a sentence of less than two years. Québec and Ontario are the only two provinces that have boards with the power to grant parole to offenders serving a sentence of less than two years.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • civil

  • criminal

Resolution #87 - The Québec Charter of victims’ rights

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will adopt a law which will create the Québec Charter of Victims’ Rights including the following provisions, among others:

  1. The right to adequate legal support (legal aid for victims);

  2. The right to fair and equitable compensation (no matter where the crime occurred);

  3. The right to be consulted on judicial decisions concerning them; and

  4. The right to be protected before, during and after the judicial process (cases of spousal abuse).

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • victims

  • criminal

Resolution #88 - Ending benefits for inmates

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will ask public safety and MTESS officials to cross-check their lists on a regular basis in order to cut social assistance benefits to inmates, and will demand that the CNESST and SAAQ do the same thing. The savings will be used to better compensate victims of crime.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • benefit

Resolution #89 - A stricter framework for the legalization of cannabis

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will:

  1. Entrust the private sector the sale of cannabis, as is already done for tobacco products, all the while ensuring that businesses who sell to minors will be severely punished;

  2. Use a part of the income from the sale of cannabis for research, education, prevention and treatment of cannabis dependence;

  3. Provide as much leeway as possible to homeowners, educational institutions, and municipalities to regulate the use of cannabis on their property or territory.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • cannabis

Resolution #90 - A More Expedient Administration of Justice

Québec has a very important role in administering justice. This mission, which is essential for the government, has experienced throughout the years its share of budgetary restrictions by Québec governments, who have chosen to administer justice according to the impulse of their budgetary allocations. In playing this dangerous game, these governments have failed on all levels. The results are obvious to all. Our investigators are not up to the task. The lawyers who work for the Attorney General, who represents the public interest, are crushed by the workload. Several crimes are not considered serious enough for us to prosecute those who have perpetrated them. Accused are released because it takes too much time to prosecute them.

A CPQ government adheres to the principle of equality of individuals, meaning the equality of all before the law, and the responsibility of individuals. Laws exist for all, and all must comply and benefit, or suffer the consequences. A CPQ government believes in everyone’s fundamental right to personal security and security of personal property; and to ensure this we must be firmer in the administration of justice and of public safety. We will allocate to the Justice Department the resources necessary to fulfill its mandate. Justice must be dissuasive. A CPQ government will accelerate the administration of justice.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • administration

Resolution #91 - Economic crimes

In Québec, most of the investigations on economic crimes led by the Sûreté du Québec originate from requests from the government or from government organizations. This leaves little room for complaints coming from the private sector. It doesn’t have to be like this since the Minister of Justice has the power to direct the Director of Public Prosecutions to allow, in the public interest, private criminal prosecutions (entirely supported by the plaintiff) to proceed in parallel with public prosecutions. A CPQ government will instruct the Director of Public Prosecutions to allow private sector criminal prosecutions for suspected economic crimes.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • economic crime

  • DPCP

Resolution #92 - The Hunting Rifle Registry

A CPQ government is against the Québec Hunting firearm Registry enabled under Bill 20. The legislative requirements of the federal government in terms of acquisition and possession of hunting weapons are already quite severe. This bill will have no effect on the number of homicides by hunting rifles.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • firearms

  • training

Resolution #93 - Withdrawing the tax benefits granted to certain places of worship

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec would abolish the tax privileges of religious organizations that have been convicted of crimes.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • taxation

  • religion

  • place of worship

Resolution #94 - Monitoring our border

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will require Ottawa to improve the surveillance of our borders and take this mission more seriously.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • border

  • immigration

Resolution #95 - Reforming Québec’s -No Fault- automobile insurance system

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will exclude from the “no fault” people and companies with criminal involvement in any road accident, so that they suffer the consequences of their actions and do not receive compensation, even in case of injury.

Keywords:

  • justice

  • public safety

  • no fault

  • compensation

  • criminal

Arts and Culture

Resolution #96 - Targeted Support

Artists practically form a society in themselves where the values and the ways of doing things may differ from that of the general population. Everybody will, however, agree that arts are an essential part of a flourishing society, of its progress and of improved well-being. How should a federal, provincial or municipal government act facing this reality? And how should artists behave vis-à-vis the government?

Two questions spontaneously come to mind: that of the governmental funding and that of the freedom and responsibility of the artist.

A CPQ government answers these questions by advocating for targeted funding, on the one hand, and full creative artistic freedom of responsible artists, on the other hand.

A CPQ government proposes to review funding to better target the promotion of culture. We wish to encourage the emergence of young talent, the creation and experimentation of artistic projects, the dissemination of promising projects, the facilitation of access to culture for the general population and the creation of strong private sponsorship.

The objective of this policy is to increase the quantity and quality of artistic productions, to create opportunities and to shine within and without our borders and to build strong private sponsorship. In this, we envision the emergence of a more dynamic, more diversified, cultural environment which will provide more freedom and be open to the world.

This brings us back to the creative freedom which must be without constraint, without government interference in the creative process and without political compromise on the part of the artist. A population that likes attending the arts and cultural venues is the best guarantee of the freedom, of the creative vitality and of the autonomy of the artist.

Keywords:

  • culture

  • art

  • subsidy

Resolution #97 - SODEC Financing Reform

SODEC is currently 100% financed by taxpayers’ money. For example, its federal counterpart in the recording industry, Musicaction, receives part of its funding in the form of federal grants, and must pick up the rest with private business. Imposing the same model of funding to SODEC would be an excellent way of ensuring that public funds are not used exclusively to finance cinema productions that few Quebecers will look at or album songwriting only a few will buy and listen.

A CPQ government will transform SODEC in a private non-profit organization (NPO) and reduce public subsidies to allow the private sector to contribute more. In addition, the Québec Government contribution to SODEC become proportional to the amount of money it has received from the private sector.

Keywords:

  • culture

  • SODEC

  • funding

  • subsidy

Resolution #98 - Detaxation of cultural products and services

In return for a more targeted use of grants in arts, culture and heritage, a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will remove the QST on the following cultural products:

-museums, interpretive centers, art galleries and heritage places with cover charges. -movie, live show, circus, or other artistic event tickets. -discs, DVDs and other media sold in the Québec market. -subscriptions to cable companies and Internet providers, as well as to content broadcasters. -Any other product or service related to culture.

Keywords:

  • culture

  • taxes

  • QST

  • art

  • museum

  • multimedia

  • streaming

Resolution #99 - Abolition of the Act respecting the development of Québec firms in the book industry.

The “book chain”, a structure established in 1981 under chapter D-8.1 (Act respecting the development of Québec firms in the book industry), defines the responsibilities of each link in the chain and the share of profits which amounts everyone who should supply where, who can sell what, when, to whom. This legislative framework is a real straitjacket for the book industry in Québec, and it’s time to modernize it in the liberalizing.

A CPQ government will abolish the Act respecting the development of Québec firms in the book industry to liberalize the marketing of books and promote the growth of the Québec economy.

Keywords:

  • culture

  • book

Resolution #100 - Funding for Télé-Québec

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will gradually phase out the subsidies paid to Télé-Québec over three years, and reinvest the savings in improving the quality and quantity of French as a second language programs in Québec. This will increase the size of the market for local Québec artists’ works in television, film, and music.

Keywords:

  • culture

  • tele-quebec

  • language

Resolution #101 - Freedom of expression

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will actively defend and promote freedom of expression, while promising to impose no new limit or constraint on it other than those already present in our current laws.

Keywords:

  • culture

  • freedom of expression

  • transparency

  • democracy

Resolution #102 - Improvement of averaging annuities

The Conservative Party of Québec wants to encourage all forms of culture. Sports, which in French were formerly referred to as “Physical Culture”, will not be an exception. That is why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will allow artists and all taxpayers with irregular incomes to be able to benefit from an averaging annuity. An amount of less than $1 million will be allowed to be spread over a period of up to 10 years, while an amount greater than $1 million will be allowed to be spread over a maximum period of 20 years.

Keywords:

  • culture

  • irregular income

  • art

  • sport

  • annuity spread

  • taxes

Agriculture

Resolution #103 - Democratizing agricultural trade union representation

The Union of Agricultural Producers (UPA) was granted the exclusive privilege of representing all of Québec’s farmers following a poll held in 1974. Since then, the UPA’s trade union monopoly has never been renewed or questioned by ballot. The Conservative Party of Québec believes that the time has come to allow Québec’s farmers to become members of the producers’ union of their choosing, in accordance with their own interests.

Keywords:

  • agriculture

  • upUPAa

  • union

Resolution #104 - Financial assistance to farmers

Agricultural companies have to be profitable. If they are given aid, it should only be used for economic leverage. Dependence of agricultural and agri-food companies on government financial aid must be capped, and market prices shouldn’t be distorted.

Keywords:

  • agriculture

  • subsidy

Resolution #105 - Performance and competitiveness

To meet these principles aimed at making agriculture more efficient and more competitive, a CPQ government will ensure that our farmers have access:

  1. to proper training at the cutting edge of technology, not only based on the production methods but also based on modern marketing techniques. Producers will thus garner most of their income from the market and not from grants;

  2. to the results of dynamic research and development to strengthen our agriculture competitiveness and efficiency;

  3. to a smaller bureaucracy in order to maximize the time spent managing the farm. We will take the necessary measures to ensure that MAPAQ and M.D.D.E.P. no longer work in isolation in agriculture but coordinate their activities on the ground;

  4. to an agricultural policy that will meet the specific needs of the regions and their climate. For example, canola doesn’t produce good results in southern Québec, while it does in Abitibi, Lac-Saint-Jean and the Lower St. Lawrence region where the temperature is suitable for this crop.

Keywords:

  • agriculture

  • training

  • technology

  • research

  • bureaucracy

  • MAPAQ

  • MDDEP

Resolution #106 - Promote the marketing of local products such as wines, ciders and liqueurs

Québec is full of local products which deserve to be in the spotlight. It often happens that the mechanisms in place do not promote the wider dissemination of such products. That is precisely the case for Québec wines and ciders.

For this reason A CPQ government will be guided by what is happening in Ontario, where the government, the LCBO and producers of alcoholic beverages have joined forces to successfully commercialize artisanal spirits produced in the province. This success has contributed to the development of this industry in Ontario.

Keywords:

  • agriculture

  • alcohol

  • soil

  • SAQ

  • marketing

Resolution #107 - Finding new uses for agricultural waste

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will make it easier for Québec’s farmers to find new uses for the waste their farms generate, such as producing energy or providing heating for their facilities.

Keywords:

  • agriculture

  • waste

  • environment

  • energy

Resolution #108 - The Fédération des producteurs acéricoles du Québec (FPAQ)

The restrictions imposed by the Fédération des producers acéricoles du Québec (FPAQ) on Québec’s maple syrup producers allowed Ontario, New Brunswick and New England to increase their market share. Furthermore, such a quota production system has no place in a true free market economy, as it increases the prices paid by consumers. Finally, the monopoly of the FPAQ is increasingly disputed among Québec’s maple syrup producers. That’s why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec would abolish the FPAQ’s monopoly on the marketing of maple products in Québec.

Keywords:

  • agriculture

  • FPAQ

  • maple

  • acericulture

Immigration

Resolution #109 - Priority to Jobs

A CPQ government supports the arrival of new immigrants in Québec. Immigrants can partly offset our demographic shrinkage and can enrich the pool of our workforce.

Beyond these utilitarian considerations, the party wants Québec to be a haven where the integration of newcomers is accomplished in the most harmonious way possible. Thus, we will have an influx of future citizens ready to love and adopt our customs freely and through interaction. The selection of immigrants will be based on a balance between economic, cultural and demographic needs.

The means chosen by the Conservative Party to achieve these objectives are threefold:

  • an enlightened selection of immigrants, with particular emphasis on the economic integration of immigrants in Québec (according to the needs of the workforce or entrepreneurial skills);

  • a welcoming policy where learning our language, our history and our traditions are especially essential; and

  • an effective policy on integration in the workplace at their skill levels, including recognition of skills acquired abroad.

Keywords:

  • immigration

  • work

  • education

  • history

  • tradition

Resolution #110 - Reasonable accommodation

The issue of accommodation vis-à-vis immigrants is an issue that draws our attention. We will approach it as follows: a clear definition of the problem (including distinguishing between the public and private sphere), usage of existing tools and appropriate and minimalist solutions based on the reasonableness of the accommodation requested and not on the reason why it’s requested.

Keywords:

  • immigration

  • religion

  • accommodation

Resolution #111 - Integration into the labour market

A successful integration into the labour market is part of the solution. Immigrants, like any other citizen, must meet their own basic needs and those of their families. Free citizens will assume their obligations, the responsibility for their choices and the consequences of their actions without waiting for the government to do it for them. In addition, integration doesn’t mean assimilation. To integrate is to take part in the economic life (working, investing or starting a business) and to take to heart the immediate environment, the city, the community. Integration will not occur if, on the one hand, the labour market is too rigid or closed and, on the other hand, if social programs are too generous.

Keywords:

  • immigration

  • work

  • investment

  • unemployment

Resolution #112 - Rights, freedom and secularity

The Charter of Rights and Freedoms contains principles that must guide our practices. Individual freedoms and a secular state will be respected. During the selection process, would-be immigrants will be informed of this reality. Common sense and the desire to live together will guide us in the application of these laws and regulations and to resolve individual cases. Our core values will be respected and the problems will not be magnified for political or ideological reasons. We recognize that integration is not a one-way street but requires an effort by all. Patience, education, empathy and respect are watchwords for the reception and integration of new Quebecers. However, there is no reason for us to encourage radical fundamentalism and we will therefore ensure that those who hold those views are not subsidized nor are they asked to be involved in the integration of new immigrants.

Keywords:

  • immigration

  • secularity

  • religion

Resolution #113 - The language of skilled workers

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will amend the selection criteria applicable to skilled workers to give the same number of points to French and English proficiency. Once they have arrived in Québec, the government will be able to help newcomers learn French.

Keywords:

  • immigration

  • language

  • work

Quebec’s place in Canada and the World

Resolution #114 - Actively participate in the Federation

Who said: ‘Québec is the anvil on which Canada was formed?’ Regardless, this sentence is not false.

Canada is historically a young country. It was formed with Québec as a cornerstone. Many events have, however, changed the face of this country since the early French explorers. Since Confederation, Canada has grown ever more westward, including provinces and territories and several ethnic groups such as the first nations, and a vast territory rich in natural and human resources.

A CPQ government values this great country and intends to take on the role of actively representing Québec within the Confederation and ensure it assumes its role as a founding nation while preserving its characteristic distinctiveness within Canada.

More active participation in the Federation will liberate economic and social forces that will improve the well-being of Quebecers and of all our fellow Canadians. Our efforts will focus on the promotion of free trade within Canada. In collaboration with our Ontario partner, we will seek to extend the scope of the Ontario-Québec trade agreement and to push it eastward. We will seek a similar agreement to the New West Partnership Trade Agreement, binding on British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan. A CPQ government will ensure such agreements benefit Québec economy. The ultimate trade objective of A CPQ government will be the establishment of free trade within Canada.

Our Influence Abroad

We will want to ensure that Canada’s influence abroad grows. We shall contribute to it in our own way. Already through our involvement in the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie, our participation in UNESCO and the strong bilateral relations that we have with some countries such as France, we play a specific role of external representation.

Looking for Synergies

Our party wants to go further by improving synergies with our partners, this time within the country, especially with neighbouring provinces and Francophone communities of Canada.

Montreal and the World

One aspect that A CPQ government intends to focus on is to open Montreal, our economic center, to the world even more. The issues addressed in this chapter and in the language and immigration chapters will find in Montreal a fertile and stimulating ground to achieve our goals if we achieve an economic and socially exemplary growth.

Keywords:

  • canada

  • federation

Social Programs

Resolution #115 - Welfare Reform

“The best way to kill a man is to pay them to do nothing.” We agree with these lyrics by Felix Leclerc. We will reform welfare to allow the greatest possible number of Quebecers to work. If a person is incapable of entering the labour market due to lack of training, we will offer them the opportunity to improve their skills (i.e. literacy courses for high school dropouts, or English and French language classes for allophones, etc.). We will also facilitate returning to school on a full-time basis if the necessary prerequisites are met.

A 35-hour volunteer position for a non-profit organization will be offered to whoever can’t find a job within a reasonable time after their training period. We will also restrict the period to which a person able to work can receive welfare to a maximum of 5 cumulative years in total.

In addition, A CPQ government will endeavour to improve the financial support available to needy people who are unable to work.

Keywords:

  • social programs

  • social assistance

  • volunteer

  • job

  • education

Resolution #116 - Tax free minimum wage

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec is committed to increasing the basic personal exemption and the work income tax credit until both combined provide full-time minimum wage workers with a tax-free income. Second, the basic personal exemption and the work income tax credit will both be indexed at the same time as the minimum wage increase every year, i.e. May 1st.

Keywords:

  • social programs

  • taxes

  • minimum wage

Resolution #117 - Comprehensive reform of social housing policy

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will sell all government-owned low-rent housing to housing co-ops and housing non-profits, who will then become responsible for their management. The savings this will generate will be used to increase the housing allowance for the underprivileged, allowing them to live where they want instead of living where the government wants to build low-rent housing. A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will also end rent control and again use the proceeds thus generated to increase the housing allowance for the poorest tenants to compensate for the rent increases that may follow.

Keywords:

  • social programs

  • housing

  • public housing

Resolution #118 - Respecting Quebeckers’ values and priorities for charity

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will gradually cease to directly subsidize all charities, and return the money saved to Quebeckers in the form of an increase in the tax credit for charitable donations. This way, rather than entrust these decisions to politicians or to public servants, Quebeckers will decide for themselves the causes that they hold dear enough to deserve their money.

Keywords:

  • social programs

  • charity

  • charity

Resolution #119 - Reforming welfare programs from the ground up

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will create an optional system for the payment of welfare in crypto-currencies, as these can be restricted to very specific transactions. By opting for this new optional system, recipients will see their payments increase significantly, to encourage them to adopt it. The benefits paid will be based on a budget: rent, food, clothing and essential goods and employment expenses. The sums received will be spent only for these purposes. Finally, an NPO will manage the points of service and help guide recipients’ behavior in their decisions with regards to purchases of products and services.

Keywords:

  • social programs

  • social assistance

  • cryptocurrency

  • technology

Resolution #120 - Social Programs Review Committee

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will periodically set up a review committee of all social programs to assess whether they contain aspects that discourage recipients from working. These aspects will then be corrected.

Keywords:

  • social programs

Resolution #121 - Permanent annuity without penalty

A CPQ government will bring the benefit replacement program for people with severe and permanent employment constraints by permanent annuity without penalty (e.g. if you have a spouse, a part-time job or an inheritance).

Keywords:

  • social programs

  • constraint

  • invalidity

Language

Resolution #122 - Economic Prosperity and Language Prosperity Go Hand in Hand

Language issues are among those that generate the most turbulent debates in Québec. A CPQ government presents itself as the one who will develop the most innovative and rational solutions to emerging issues. This will be done in an ethical way by respecting everybody.

Keywords:

  • language

  • ethics

Resolution #123 - A Strong Economy Supports a Strong Language

French is a beautiful language and it represents Quebecers most powerful cultural symbols. Our party is committed to be its ardent defender in Québec and in Canada, so that it can, through a ripple effect, also shine outside the country’s borders. This undertaking is therefore one of the cornerstones of our platform.

The promotion of the French language will be at the forefront of our relations with the Federal government as well as with the other provinces and territories. The promotion of the French language in all public institutions, and the promotion of French immersion and student exchange programs will be one of our measurable targets. They will be implemented with tact and in a constructive manner without arrogance. Thus, with determination, A CPQ government promises to protect and promote the French language in the country. We look forward to a more bilingual and more harmonious Canada where Québec takes its rightful place.

To the extent of its possibilities and of its responsibilities, a CPQ government will promote the vitality of the French language at the international level, particularly through artistic activities and exchange programs. We will seek to bring the different linguistic communities closer together by building bridges between them rather than erect barriers.

A CPQ government will promote the development of the French language by focusing on the attraction of the French language within the context of Bill 101. Moreover, our love of the French language doesn’t translate into fear of other languages. To be able to develop and prosper across the world, Quebecers, and especially our youth, need to learn other languages, notably English. A CPQ government will prioritize the improvement of the quality of its French-language instruction in Québec primary and secondary schools and will require a working knowledge of the English language as a minimum standard for all Québec students to obtain a high school diploma.

We are opposed to the extension of Bill 101 to College students.

We will adopt, as a government, economic and fiscal policies which will end the relative decline that Québec has come to know in the last 50 years. A strong economy will contribute to the development of French and increase its attraction. We will put an end to the exodus of our citizens and attract newcomers who will be happy to come and willing to work in French.

Minority language communities will be guided and encouraged to adopt our language as a means of mutual enrichment. We will end the perception of linguistic xenophobia on the part of the government.

Keywords:

  • language

  • economy

  • education

  • international

Resolution #124 - Encouraging bilingualism

A government of the Conservative Party of Québec will put in place the following language policy.

The Conservative Party of Québec will:

  • protect Québec’s francophone character, its charm, and French as Québec’s common language, by equipping students of all levels, of all native languages and of all ages with French improvement programs.

  • focus more on attraction to French rather than coercion.

  • offer parents tax credits to offset the costs associated with learning French and English, for their offspring and for themselves.

  • match Québec schools with schools from other Canadian provinces in new immersion programs in partnership.

  • give young people in Québec the taste for learning languages, and will interest young children in bilingualism, first in Canada’s two official languages, and then in learning a third language.

  • support Canadian organizations and associations dedicated to the French language and bilingualism throughout Canada and the English language and bilingualism in Québec.

Keywords:

  • language

  • bilingualism

  • education

Transportation

Resolution #125 - Gasoline prices

Families do not always have the option of taking public transit, and they can’t all afford to purchase an electric vehicle. Therefore, the Conservative Party of Québec will repeal section 59 of the Energy Board Act and section 67 of the Petroleum Products Act which, although well intentioned at the outset, only protects gasoline retailers to the detriment of Québec consumers, who must pay more for gasoline than elsewhere in Canada. A government of the Conservative Party of Québec would also abolish the carbon tax, the so-called “Heurtel tax”, named for its creator, liberal minister David Heurtel. Indeed, even before the creation of this 11th gasoline tax, Quebeckers already paid more for gasoline than all other Canadians, except for Vancouverites. Therefore, the Conservative Party of Québec believes that Québec already its part for air pollution before this tax was created, and that Québec should wait until the price of gasoline in the rest of Canada catches up with Québec’s before asking Quebeckers to make yet more sacrifices. We must not delude ourselves: this tax is very expensive for Québec families, as its creation wasn’t accompanied by matching tax cuts to make it revenue neutral.

Keywords:

  • transport

  • essence

  • carbon tax

  • taxes

  • pollution

Resolution #126 - More affordable cars for those who really need them

The rebate program for the purchase or leasing of an electric car that the Liberal government subsidizes the purchase of new cars that Québec’s poorest residents can’t afford, even with the maximum amount of $8000 that this rebate can reach. Worse still, the Act to increase the number of zero-emission vehicles in Québec to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, which entered into force on January 1, 2018, will increase the price of the most affordable vehicles, i.e. gasoline-powered subcompact cars. In short, with these two liberal policies, a poor family living in a city not served by public transit or car-sharing, and who therefore has no choice but to purchase an automobile, will find themselves paying indirectly for the luxurious electric car of a wealthy bachelor who lives in an upscale neighborhood in the middle of town. That is why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec is committed to stop subsidizing the purchase of electric cars and to stop forcing Québec’s car dealerships to sell them. As the cost of this new technology continues to decrease and as battery life continues to improve, electric cars will soon be accessible to all Quebeckers, without any government intervention.

Keywords:

  • transport

  • electric vehicle

  • dealer

Resolution #127 - Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) in Infrastructure

A CPQ government is committed to achieving, in PPPs, infrastructure works needed to improve the flow of traffic on road networks.

Keywords:

  • transport

  • infrastructure

  • partnership

  • third link

  • quebec city

Resolution #128 - Competition in Public Transportation

Municipalities wishing to offer additional public transportation services must deal with very high costs. The salaries paid to employees of municipalities with a population of 25,000 people or more is 18.6% above the level offered to employees of the provincial public sector. When benefits are factored in, their total compensation reaches a level which is 33.6% above that of the provincial public sector. The employees of municipal transportation authorities enjoy compensation levels which are roughly comparable to their municipal colleagues.

The current costs of public transportation are an obstacle to its development. In certain areas, if we require public transportation commissions to increase the frequency or the number of runs, additional losses would be incurred as a result of the high compensation offered to their employees.

In addition, the monopoly enjoyed by public transportation authorities forestalls the development of complementary or competitive services. Such private transportation services could meet particular needs, increase the services in areas less well served or enhance the number and frequency of services. Such competition could convince public transportation commissions to better manage their costs or to suspend services which are no longer required.

A CPQ government will favour the development of private transportation services if they are profitable, complementary or competitive. The second paragraph of section 80 of the «Loi sur les sociétés de transport en commun» will be abolished.

Keywords:

  • transport

  • public transportation

  • competition

  • carpool

  • car sharing

Resolution #129 - Speed cameras

The first speed cameras in Québec were installed at almost the same time as the winter tire requirement came into force, thus complicating the analysis of their effectiveness in the Province. In addition, the Liberal Party of Québec has amended the regulations on speed cameras to transform into admissible evidence what a Québec Court Judge has described as “hearsay” which has “no value as evidence”, thus compromising the rights of Quebeckers to introduce what looks like yet another disguised tax. Finally, while many politicians and citizens believe that lower speed limits and rigorous application of speed limits by automated traffic control systems are a panacea for improving road safety, there exists scientific evidence that says otherwise.

That is why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will turn off all speed cameras for one year, and then reactivate them only if the number of accidents increases faster than the intensity of the traffic at the specific locations where they were installed.

Keywords:

  • transport

  • safety

  • photo radar

Resolution #130 - Speed limit on Québec highways"

It has been shown that speed limits do not have the effect of reducing the speed of motorists. In addition, artificially low speed limits have become a new source of funding for governments through ticketing. Finally, the speed at which motorists travel is more often dictated by the configuration of the road and by its conditions.

That is why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec:

  1. Will adopt the 85th percentile rule, which dictates that the speed limit on roads should be no less than the speed at which on average 85% of motorists are circulating;

  2. Will install intelligent variable speed limit road signage on main highways, which will allow variable speed limits on Québec’s highways depending on road conditions; and

  3. Will increase the speed limit to 120 km/h where road conditions and lighting allow this to be done safely.

Keywords:

  • transport

  • speed limit

  • highway

Resolution #131 - Autonomous vehicles

Driverless cars will have a much better safety record than cars driven by human beings, who can be tired, nervous, intoxicated or distracted at the wheel, and this safety record will only improve with the technological progress to come. In addition, these cars will help Québec reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by encouraging carpooling and car-sharing. That is why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will promote research, development and the introduction of new self-driving vehicle technologies on the province’s road network in all municipalities that will agree to it.

Keywords:

  • transport

  • autonomous vehicle

  • car sharing

Environment

Resolution #132 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 1

The goal of this policy is to present the main principles underlying the positions to be taken by A CPQ government on development and environment. These statements will guide the actions of the party in these matters and will be a ‘filter’ through which the intentions of the party must pass before being proposed.

From the outset, we choose an economic approach as the best means of progress for our society. This progress is possible and desirable, but to get there, we have a duty to explore and exploit our natural resources if we are to meet the needs of a growing population. This quest, however, must be pursued while minimizing the impact on the environment. We endorse responsible practices and new technologies to ensure the sustainability of renewable resources for future generations. Free enterprise is better than bureaucrats to select the best technology to achieve this purpose. Economic exploitation necessarily generates risks that we must manage and minimize with the best available technologies. However, we accept that the complete absence of risk is incompatible with any economic development activity.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • economy

  • risk

Resolution #133 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 2

We believe that the economic development of Québec must be achieved by a market economy, that is to say voluntary exchanges between individuals, rather than a nationalized economy or one that is planned by the government. The government should not act as a substitute for private enterprise. Rather, it should provide an environment that promotes competition, a source of innovation beneficial to the well-being of its citizens. Rules are necessary but we need to be aware that each rule generates economic and possibly special costs. They should not be nitpicking or constrain a free and thriving market. Since there is an economic and social expense of postponing material advancement, the environmental assessments will be diligent and they will build on existing best practices here and elsewhere.

Environmental policies will be based on science. They will be supported by logic and reason rather than beliefs, dogmas, or the political agendas of interest groups. Often, exaggerations or biases prevent decision-making in this field, which adversely affects the well-being of the population. Our party will always favour an objective assessment of the cost and of the socio-economic impacts of development.

Science differentiates causes and correlations. A correlation doesn’t imply a cause and effect relationship. A forecast, to be credible, must be based on proven facts. A forecast remains a forecast and is not a certainty.

Science doesn’t operate by consensus. The government can’t transform a scientific hypothesis into a fact on the basis of a scientific consensus.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • economy

  • free market

  • natural resources

  • science

Resolution #134 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 3

We accept that any development activity by humans includes an environmental risk, but also real and measurable benefits. We reject the principle of precaution based on the premise that it’s necessary to demonstrate the absence of any doubt that an action can’t cause any harm to be socially acceptable. Rather, we advocate a balanced approach where we compare the risks and the potential benefits of an action with the risks and the benefits of inaction. In order to do this, we evaluate all known factors and we use a probabilistic approach to arrive at a reasonable conclusion.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • risk

  • economic development

  • economy

Resolution #135 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 4

Clearly defined and transferable property rights which can be sanctioned in the courts can offer a more economical and effective solution to resolve environmental conflicts than the complex environmental laws implemented in recent decades. Although they are not the solution to all environmental issues, such property rights can ensure that no one is obliged to accept a deterioration of their environment beyond acceptable community standards.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • private property

Resolution #136 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 5

The government doesn’t have the same long-term motivation as a private business owner to protect the environment. The wealth of the owner depends on good management of resources. If they wants to be able to take advantage of the resource as long as possible and produce the greatest benefit when they disposes of it. They has a greater incentive than the government to preserve and improve its value and usefulness. A market economy promotes better use of resources since companies will be looking to maximize their profits by reducing costs and minimizing the amount of resources they consume.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • private property

Resolution #137 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 6

We need to ensure that the largest number of people benefit from Québec natural resources. The Québec government must put in place a regulatory regime that fosters their exploitation by the private sector while respecting the rights of all citizens. Such as:

  • Hydroelectricity is a clean, inexpensive and sustainable source of energy. The creation of lakes and reservoirs has an environmental impact and it improves the quality of life for human beings.

  • Québec mines provide needed materials to improve the standard of living and the life expectancy of human beings.

  • Québec forestry (planting and harvesting of wood) is the source of green building material and of abundant renewable energy. Its development has limited environmental impact and reduces the level of harvesting from natural forests.

  • Québec agriculture benefits from genetic science that enables yields to increase while reducing the environmental impact. More abundant and cheaper food increases health and food security for the population. More prolific and resistant plants require less fertilizer, pesticides and irrigation. Higher yields require less farmland, reducing pressure on the natural environment.

  • Québec aquaculture can be an important source of healthy food and can ease the pressure on wild fish stocks.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • natural resources

  • energy

  • forestry

  • agriculture

  • economy

Resolution #138 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 7

A decision to allow a product for use should not be based on whether it has been produced by “nature” or by man but rather should be based on a scientific approach.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • science

Resolution #139 - Environment - Robust Development While Managing Risks - 8

Poverty can create the worst environmental problems. Poorly fed and poorly housed people do not care about the long-term preservation of their environment because they have only one concern, i.e. to meet their basic needs. The economic development of poor countries must be a priority to improve the quality of the environment on our planet. Québec can do its part to help developing countries reduce their environmental problems by helping them grow their economies through international trade. By fostering science and economic development, Québec can also help reduce disease and malnutrition worldwide.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • economic development

  • poverty

Resolution #140 - Carbon Market

A CPQ government will end and prohibit any form of market organized by the state and based on the generation of waste or chemical compounds with no commercial value, or other artificial market aimed indirect taxation of such a product unless a significant number of accede and that States have an equal or greater tax cut of revenue from this market.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • carbon stock exchange

  • carbon tax

Resolution #141 - Abolition of the QST on the resale of used goods

The more one extends the useful life of a consumer, the more we decrease its ecological footprint. In other words, the more a property is used for a long time, the more damage that the production of this well has caused to the environment are amortized over a longer period of time. Or, apply to used goods QST returns to discourage the purchase, which harms the environment because the production of new consumer goods is a polluting process.

Moreover, apart from some thrift trendy upscale areas, most used goods, such as clothing, are purchased by the less fortunate in society. Therefore, applying the QST on the sale of used goods is the practice disproportionately affects the poor.

A CPQ government completely cease taxing the resale of all used consumer goods, including automobiles.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • taxes

  • QST

  • use

  • recycling

Resolution #142 - Abolition of the refund on bottles and cans

5 and 10-cent refund on the bottles were created at a time selective collection of recyclables did not exist. Now that it covers almost the entire territory of Québec, it would be greener to put containers that are currently on the refund system in our recycling bins. By doing so, transportation of recyclable materials to sorting centres find itself consolidated, which would reduce emissions of greenhouse gases.

Finally, as the set would have no raison d’être, it would be abolished, which makes it easy for merchants who sell products in containers that are currently recorded.

A CPQ government would abolish the refund on all bottles and cans and encourage Quebecers to put them in their recycling bin.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • refund

  • recycling

Resolution #143 - Increasing the tax deduction for moving expenses

The closer a motorist lives to his place of work or study, the less he must pollute to get to his place of work or study.

That is why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will only require that a taxpayer move 20 km closer to his place of work or study to make his moving expenses tax deductible, rather than 40 km closer as is currently the case.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • moving

  • transport

  • work

Resolution #144 - Motor vehicles with high-displacement engines and paid carpooling

As the number of passengers a vehicle can carry increases, the amount of air pollution produced per passenger decreases. This is this basic principle that makes public transport more environmentally friendly than a lone driver in his own vehicle. As a result, a minivan, a crossover or an SUV filled with 7 or 8 passengers pollutes less per passenger than a subcompact filled with 4 or 5 passengers. However, extra sales taxes and additional registration fees on vehicles with higher-displacement engines discourage the purchase of vehicles that can carry more passengers, and thus a more efficient and environmentally friendly carpool. They can also discourage entrepreneurship because these vehicles are also frequently used as tools for work or business. Finally, the regulations protecting the taxi industry discourage paid carpooling services like Uber, UberPOOL, Lyft and Lyft Line, discouraging a key environmentally friendly behavior that reduces congestion and helps clean the air we breathe. These paid carpooling services would also help improve the availability of transportation services in little or underserved transit routes in remote areas of the Province.

That is why a government of the Conservative Party of Québec will abolish the extra sales taxes and the additional license plate fees on vehicles with higher-displacement engines, as these vehicles are often used for carpooling or as tools for work or business. In addition, it will encourage deregulation of the taxi industry to encourage carpooling.

Keywords:

  • environment

  • carpool

  • sharing economy

  • registration